Offense 101: Individual Offense Concepts

All lacrosse players can benefit from a solid understanding of offensive concepts. The following list of offensive skills provides some fundamental information for both new players and experienced.

These skills are applicable to both offensive (Attack) players and Midfielders (Middies).

If you have questions about these or don't understand some of terminology. Please head over to our lacrosse glossary of terms.

  1. Make yourself a threat. If you constantly force your defenseman to focus on you he cannot be a part of the team defense, so DO NOT stand still and wait for a pass, it actually hurts the offense as a whole.
  2. While moving the ball around the outside, make the short, easy pass. Also, hit your man on the outside hand, away from the defenseman's stick.
  3. Feed passes must be hard: a "buddy pass" to the crease will get your teammate crushed by any good defense.
  4. Standing still with the ball allows the defense to set up and pressure you. Keep moving to create space with which to make a pass.
  5. Pass overhand.
  6. Move towards an incoming pass in order to get separation from your defenseman.
  7. When you have the ball, be constantly faking passes - keep your defense man's stick moving.
  8. When in possession of ball, make the defense man play your stick - watch his stick - the position of it will determine the direction of your feed and the type of dodge you might try.
  9. Practice your stick-work to ensure that all passes are on target.
  10. Never dump the ball of to a covered man just for the sake of getting rid of the ball. If you are being pressured, pull it out. Most defensemen won't follow you all the way out, and if they do you are now in a position to beat him and go to the goal.
  11. A loose ball must be fought for as hard as possible. Losing a ground ball means a clear and a lost opportunity to score.
  12. Shoot plenty, but only if you feel you have a good shot.

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la - crosse

/ləˈkrôs,-ˈkräs/
(noun)
a team game, originally played by North American Indians, in which the ball is thrown, caught, and carried with a long-handled stick having a curved L-shaped or triangular frame at one end with a piece of shallow netting in the angle.